Headlines

Summary

  1. Department of Homeland Security Announces Controversial Proposed Rule on Changes to Public Charge Definition

    DHS has announced that it will soon publish a controversial proposed rule that would make it much more difficult for many who have lower incomes or less education, or who have received public benefits, to become permanent residents.

  2. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Proposes Change in Fee Waiver Evidence

    USCIS would reduce the evidence required for the I-912 to only a person's household income. The agency would no longer require proof of whether an individual receives a means-tested benefit.

  3. President Signs Temporary Funding Bill Extending Four Immigration Provisions Until December 7

    The E-Verify, Conrad State 30 J-1 waiver program for certain foreign physicians, EB-5 regional center and special immigrant non-minister religious worker programs have been extended past the September 30 deadline by late-breaking legislation.

  4. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Now Accepting Copies of Negative O Visa Consultations Directly from Labor Unions

    USCIS has begun accepting copies of negative consultation letters directly from labor unions relating to current or future O nonimmigrant visa petitions.

  5. USCIS Changes Filing Location for Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence

    Petitioners must send Form I-751 to a USCIS Lockbox facility.

  6. USCIS Extends Validity of Certain EADs for TPS Beneficiaries From Somalia, El Salvador

    USCIS has automatically extended the validity of certain EADs issued under the TPS designations for Somalia and El Salvador.

  7. Attorney General Delivers Remarks to Largest Immigration Judge (IJ) Class in History

    Among other things, Mr. Sessions said more immigration judges will be added by the end of this calendar year, "with a goal of seeing a 50 percent increase in the number" of judges since the beginning of the Trump administration.

  8. Klasko News

    The latest news at the firm including recent and upcoming events and publications.

1. Department of Homeland Security Announces Controversial Proposed Rule on Changes to Public Charge Definition

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced that it will soon publish a controversial proposed rule that would make it much more difficult for many who have lower incomes or less education, or who have received public benefits, to become permanent residents, obtain visas, or extend or change/adjust their nonimmigrant visa status. Reportedly, rumors of the impending rule have already resulted in some immigrants in the United States dropping out of social services for fear of potential complications to their efforts to stay in the country.

Currently, those who are likely to become a burden on the government can already be excluded if they accept certain cash benefits. The proposed rule would greatly expand the definition of public benefits to be considered when public charge determinations are made. DHS explained that the public benefits proposed to be designated in this rule include federal, state, local, or tribal cash assistance for income maintenance, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Medicaid (with limited exceptions for Medicaid benefits paid for an “emergency medical condition,” and for certain disability services related to education), Medicare Part D Low Income Subsidy, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, or food stamps), institutionalization for long-term care at government expense, Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program, Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance, and public housing. The first three benefits listed above are cash benefits that are already covered under current policy, DHS said.

There are some exclusions. DHS noted that by statute, asylees, refugees, and other categories of vulnerable individuals are not subject to the public charge ground of inadmissibility. When considering receipt of public benefits in the public charge inadmissibility determination, DHS would also not consider any public benefits received by those serving in active duty or in the Ready Reserve component of the U.S. Armed Forces, or the spouse or child of the service member. Additionally, DHS would not consider disaster relief, emergency medical assistance, benefits received by a person’s U.S. citizen children, or Medicaid benefits received by children of U.S. citizens and potential adoptive children of U.S. citizens.

Among other things, the proposed rule would also require an immigrant to earn at least 125 percent of the federal poverty guidelines, and states that a household income of 250 percent of that level would be deemed “heavily positive.” Heavily weighted positive factors would include “significant income, assets, and resources.” Income and financial status would be considered as part of the “totality of the circumstances.” Some deemed inadmissible on public charge grounds might be allowed to pay for a public charge bond at the risk of losing it if they use any of the listed benefits. Negative considerations would include limited English proficiency and adverse physical or mental health conditions.

The proposed rule would also allow U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to consider whether an applicant is using or receiving, or likely to use or receive, public benefits. The proposed rule would impose new costs on people applying to get green cards using Form
I-485 who are subject to the public charge grounds of inadmissibility. DHS would require any adjustment applicants subject to the public charge inadmissibility ground to submit new Form
I-944 with their Form I-485 to demonstrate they are not likely to become a public charge.

The proposed rule would also impose additional costs for seeking extension of stay or change of status by filing Form I-129 (Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker), Form I-129CW (Petition for a CNMI-Only Nonimmigrant Transitional Worker), or Form I-539 (Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status), as applicable. These applicants would have to demonstrate that they have not received, are not currently receiving, and are not likely in the future to receive, public benefits as described. DHS noted that these applicants may also incur additional costs if the agency determines that they must submit Form I-944 in support of their applications for extension of stay or change of status. Moreover, the proposed rule would impose new costs associated with the proposed public charge bond process, including new costs for completing and filing Form I-945 (Public Charge Bond) and Form I-356 (Request for Cancellation of Public Charge Bond).

In addition to the effects on individuals, DHS said it recognizes that anticipated reductions in federal and state transfers under federal benefit programs as a result of the proposed rule may have “downstream and upstream impacts on state and local economies, large and small businesses, and individuals.” For example, DHS explained, the rule might result in reduced revenues for healthcare providers participating in Medicaid, pharmacies that provide prescriptions to participants in the Medicare Part D Low Income Subsidy (LIS) program, companies that manufacture medical supplies or pharmaceuticals, grocery retailers participating in SNAP, agricultural producers who grow foods that are eligible for purchase using SNAP benefits, or landlords participating in federally funded housing programs.

Current or past applications for or receipt of public benefits as defined “suggests that the alien’s overall financial status is so weak that he or she is or was unable to fully support him or herself without government assistance, i.e., that the alien will receive such benefits in the future. DHS, therefore, proposes to consider any current and past receipt of certain public benefits “as a negative factor in the totality of the circumstances, because it is indicative of a weak financial status and increases the likelihood that the alien will become a public charge in the future.” DHS proposes that past receipt of a fee waiver be considered as part of the financial status factor. “Requesting or receiving a fee waiver for an immigration benefit suggests a weak financial status. Since fee waivers are based on an inability to pay, a fee waiver for an immigration benefit suggests an inability to be self-sufficient,” DHS said.

DHS also said that an applicant’s education and skills “are mandatory statutory factors that must be considered when determining whether an alien is likely to become a public charge in the future.” In general, DHS said, someone with educational credentials and skills “is more employable and less likely to become a public charge.” DHS, therefore, proposes that when considering this factor, the agency would consider “whether the alien has adequate education and skills to either obtain or maintain employment sufficient to avoid becoming a public charge, if authorized for employment,” to include consideration of the applicant’s history of employment, English proficiency, licenses, certifications, and academic degrees.

Another proposed “heavily weighed negative factor” would be a lack of “private health insurance or the financial resources to pay for reasonably foreseeable medical costs related to a medical condition that is likely to require extensive medical treatment or institutionalization or that will interfere with the alien’s ability to provide care for him- or herself, to attend school, or to work.” A person may provide evidence of the prospect of obtaining health insurance, such as pending employment that provides employer-sponsored health insurance, DHS said. With respect to a person’s general state of health, DHS said the agency “would rely on panel physician and civil surgeon medical examination for purposes of whether an individual’s circumstances [give] rise to this heavily weighted negative factor.” Age would also be considered, with an age of less than 18 or greater than 61 requiring a demonstration of employment or sufficient household assets and resources.

The categories and programs could change under the final rule, which could take many months up to a year or longer before it is finalized. Among other things, the Trump administration will need to review potentially thousands of comments before it can finalize the rule. Moreover, the rule is likely to be subject to litigation.

DHS said the proposed rule will be published in the Federal Register “in the coming weeks.” Once it is published, a comment period will last 60 days. A DHS press release announcing the proposed rule is here. A copy of the proposed rule marked “unofficial” and provided by DHS is here

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2. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Proposes Change in Fee Waiver Evidence

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has proposed revising evidence requirements for Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. Specifically, USCIS would reduce the evidence required for the I-912 to only a person’s household income and no longer require proof of whether an individual receives a means-tested benefit.

USCIS explained that its policy since 2011 has been to permit a fee waiver where an applicant received a means-tested benefit, even for a short period of time. USCIS said it has found that the various income levels used in states to grant means-tested benefits “result in inconsistent income levels being used to determine eligibility for a fee waiver.” Therefore, the revised form “will not permit a fee waiver based on receipt of a means-tested benefit but will retain the poverty-guideline threshold and financial hardship criteria.”

USCIS said that if it decides to proceed with the form revision after considering public comments, it will rescind Policy Memorandum PM-602-0011.1, Fee Waiver Guidelines as Established by the Final Rule of the USCIS Fee Schedule; Revisions to Adjudicator’s Field Manual (AFM) Chapter 10.9, AFM Update AD11-26 (Mar. 13, 2011) and issue new guidance on the documentation acceptable for individuals to present to demonstrate that they are unable to pay a fee when requesting a fee waiver. The applications and petitions that are eligible for a fee waiver will not be changed by this form and policy change, USCIS said.

USCIS will accept comments on this proposed change until November 27, 2018. Instructions on how to send comments are here.

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3. President Signs Temporary Funding Bill Extending Four Immigration Provisions Until December 7

The E-Verify, Conrad State 30 J-1 waiver program for certain foreign physicians, EB-5 regional center, and special immigrant non-minister religious worker programs have been extended past the September 30 deadline by late-breaking legislation. President Donald Trump signed a combined “minibus” appropriations bill and continuing resolution on September 28, 2018, to continue funding these and other programs until December 7, 2018.

More information on the legislation is here. The Visa Bulletin for October 2018 is here.  

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4. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Now Accepting Copies of Negative O Visa Consultations Directly from Labor Unions

Effective September 14, 2018, the USCIS has begun accepting copies of negative consultation letters directly from labor unions relating to current or future O nonimmigrant visa petitions. A consultation letter from a U.S. peer group, labor organization, and/or management organization is generally required for petitions in the O visa classification.

O-1 and O-2 nonimmigrant visas are available to individuals with extraordinary ability in science, education, business, athletics, or the arts; individuals with extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry; and certain essential support personnel.

USCIS explained that typically, a petitioner submits the necessary O visa consultation with the petition, and that this process requirement remains unchanged. USCIS Director L. Francis Cissna recently met with several labor unions to discuss concerns they had with the consultation process for O visa petitions, particularly “that some advisory opinions may be falsified by petitioners and submitted to USCIS as no-objections or favorable consultations, when in fact these were negative,” the agency said. The labor unions will now be able to send a copy of a negative consultation letter to USCIS so it can be compared to the consultation letter submitted to USCIS by the petitioner.

USCIS said labor unions should send copies of negative O nonimmigrant consultation letters to UnionConsultationMailbox@uscis.dhs.gov. To make sure USCIS matches the letters to the correct petitions, labor unions should include the last five digits of each beneficiary’s passport number in the consultation letters.

After six months, USCIS will analyze the data collected “to identify areas for improvement in the consultation process.”

The announcement can be read in full here.

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5. USCIS Changes Filing Location for Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence

On September 10, 2018, USCIS changed the filing location for Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence. This form was previously filed at the California and Vermont Service Centers. Now, petitioners must send Form I-751 to a USCIS Lockbox facility, with the California, Nebraska, Vermont, and Texas Service Centers all serving as adjudicating offices. When filing at a USCIS Lockbox facility, petitioners have the option to pay the fee with a money order, personal check, cashier’s check, or credit card.

For more information, click here. USCIS’s I-751 webpage is here.

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6. USCIS Extends Validity of Certain EADs for TPS Beneficiaries From Somalia, El Salvador

USCIS has automatically extended the validity of certain EADs issued under the TPS designations for Somalia and El Salvador. Following are highlights:

Somalia. USCIS has automatically extended the validity of EADs issued under the TPS designation for Somalia with an original expiration date of September 17, 2018, for 180 days, through March 16, 2019. Additionally, Somalian nationals who have EADs with an expiration date of March 17, 2017, and who applied for a new EAD during the last re-registration period but have not yet received it are covered by this automatic extension.

Those who are covered by this automatic extension may continue to use their existing EADs through March 16, 2019, as evidence that they are authorized to work, USCIS said.

The following documentation constitutes proof of authorization for a Somali TPS beneficiary to continue working legally in the United States:

  • A TPS-related EAD with a September 17, 2018, expiration date, or
  • A TPS-related EAD with a March 17, 2017, expiration date and an EAD application receipt (Form I-797C, Notice of Action) noting that the application was received on or after January 17, 2017.

The Federal Register notice can be read in full here. USCIS’s webpage on Somalian TPS is here.

El Salvador. USCIS has automatically extended the validity of EADs issued under the TPS designation for El Salvador through March 4, 2019. The EADs of TPS beneficiaries under the El Salvador designation whose EADs are based on TPS may now be valid through March 4, 2019, if the EAD includes a category code of A12 or C19, the beneficiary has not received his or her new EAD, and:

  • The EAD has a marked expiration date of March 9, 2018, and the beneficiary applied for a new EAD after January 18, 2018; or
  • The EAD has a marked expiration date of September 9, 2016, and the beneficiary applied for a new EAD on or after July 8, 2016.

USCIS said it will mail a Notice of Continued Evidence of Work Authorization to individuals who are eligible for the additional 180-day automatic extension. The notice will provide evidence of the automatic extension of the EAD through March 4, 2019, to show to employers. Individuals who receive the notice may use it in combination with their current EADs as evidence of work authorization through March 4, 2019. Those who have a pending EAD application and believe they are eligible for the additional automatic extension but did not receive the Notice of Continued Evidence of Work Authorization by September 4, 2018, should contact USCIS at 202-272-8377 or the USCIS Contact Center number can be found here.

Eligible beneficiaries may show their employers USCIS’s webpage on El Salvador TPS (click on the ‘Automatic Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Extension’ link is here) in combination with the current EAD to demonstrate continued employment authorization until they receive their Notice of Continued Evidence of Work Authorization.

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7. Attorney General Delivers Remarks to Largest Immigration Judge (IJ) Class in History

On September 10, 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivered remarks to 44 new IJs, the largest class of IJs in history.

Among other things, Mr. Sessions said more IJs will be added by the end of this calendar year, “with a goal of seeing a 50 percent increase in the number” of IJs since the beginning of the Trump administration.

He also said that “[g]ood lawyers, using all of their talents and skill, work every day—like water seeping through an earthen dam—to get around the plain words of the [Immigration and Nationality Act] to advance their clients’ interests. Theirs is not the duty to uphold the integrity of the act. That is our most serious duty.” He called attention to the fact that earlier in 2018, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) “announced that it would seek to refer 100 percent of illegal border crossers to the Department of Justice for criminal prosecution in Federal courts.” He said that U.S. Attorneys are prosecuting over 90 percent of those cases referred to the Department of Justice, which he noted is a “two to threefold increase” and is the “‘zero tolerance’ policy you have heard about. You don’t get to enter the border unlawfully, between ports of entry, and place our [Customs and Border Protection] officers at risk without consequences.”

Mr. Sessions said that the asylum system “has been abused for years to the detriment of the rule of law, sound public policy, and public safety.” He said that “[s]aying a few simple words—claiming a fear of return—has transformed a straightforward arrest for illegal entry and immediate return…too often into a prolonged legal process, where an alien may be released from custody into the United States and possibly never show up for an immigration hearing.” He asserted that “the vast majority of the current asylum claims are not valid under the law.” He said that for the past five years, only 20 percent of claims have been found to be meritorious after a hearing before an IJ, and that in addition, roughly 15 percent are found invalid by USCIS as a part of their initial credible fear screenings. “Further illustrating this point,” Mr. Sessions said, “in 2009, DHS conducted more than 5,000 credible fear reviews. By 2016, only seven years later, that number had increased to 94,000. The number of these aliens placed in immigration court proceedings went from fewer than 4,000 to more than 73,000 by 2016—nearly a 19-fold increase—overwhelming the system and leaving legitimate claims buried.”

Mr. Sessions also said it is the duty of the IJs to carry out his ruling on the principles of asylum and immigration law, and said “there will be more still to come.” “When we depart from the law and create nebulous legal standards out of a sense of sympathy for the personal circumstances of a respondent in our immigration courts, we do violence to the rule of law and constitutional fabric that bind this great nation. Your job is to apply the law—even in tough cases. As we work to restore rule of law in our immigration system, we will send a clear message to the world that the lawless practices of the past are over. The world will know what our rules are, and great numbers will no longer undertake this dangerous journey.”

The full text of Mr. Sessions’ speech can be found here.

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8. Klasko News

FIRM NEWS

NEW FACES AT KLASKO
The firm is pleased to have welcomed a new attorney and five new paralegals over the summer. Natalia Gouz joined the firm and has experience in both high-volume, routine cases and complex immigration issues requiring creative solutions. Klasko is also excited to welcome five new paralegals to the team: Anna O’Neill, Madison Gross, Valeria Huh, Hanna Smith-Benjamin, and Tessa Polksy.


IN THE NEWS

Ron’s Induction into the Most Powerful Employment Attorney Hall Of Fame and Bill’s Recognition Receives News Coverage
Ron and Bill earned placement on Human Resource Executive magazine and Lawdragon’s annual publication of this “best of” lawyer list, now in its 11th year of publication, with Ron being honored with an induction into the Most Powerful Employment Attorney Hall Of Fame. This news was picked up by CityBizList as well as the Alliance of Business Immigration Lawyers’ newsletter

Forbes interviews William A. Stock as expert on H-1B Changes
Bill spoke to Forbes about who the recent H-1B changes will affect in an article titled ‘Who Will Be Hurt By The Latest USCIS Decision On H-1B Visas?’. The article addressed concerns with the recent USCIS decision to extend and expand the suspension of premium processing or H-1B visas and its effect on individuals and their employers.


RECENT SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

Anu Nair
On September 26, Anu spoke at Villanova University’s School of Law on a panel discussion about immigration and what challenges immigration lawyers are facing today as well as the rewards of immigration practice.

Feige M. Grundman l Andrew J. Zeltner
Feige and Drew presented on a panel entitled “Immigration Compliance: I-9; E-Verify; Audits and Site Visits; Penalties” at the Pennsylvania Bar Institute on Friday, September 21, covering the latest trends and strategies in worksite compliance.

Ronald Klasko | William A. Stock
On September 20, the 2018 American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Federal Court Conference and Webcast hosted live and interactive sessions featuring Bill and Ron, covering essential knowledge and practice tips you’ll need to litigate business cases successfully in federal court.

Anu Nair | Karuna Simbeck | Jessica DeNisi
Anu, Karuna, and Jessica participated in the NES Financial webinar, H-1B to EB-5: Stay Permanently, Work Anywhere, educating attendees on the requirements, process, and realistic timeline for obtaining a green card through the EB-5 program. You can view the recording here.

Lisa Felix
Lisa spoke at University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine’s Biomedical Postdoctoral Immigration Seminar in August and covered topics including the effects of recent immigration policy changes, visa options, and green card applications. Additionally, on September 26, Lisa participated as a panelist at Temple University’s annual Law Day’s “Immigration: Insight from the Experts.”

Ronald Klasko
In August, Ron spoke alongside Donald Braun, President of HALL Group, and Dr. Jim Long, managing member of HALL Arts II Fund, LP at an informative workshop titled, “Issues in 2018 and Beyond”. The workshop covered best options to remain in the United States given the current state of immigration affairs.

Elise A. Fialkowski
Also in August, Elise participated on two different panels at the 2018 AILA Employer Compliance & Worksite Enforcement Conference in Boston covering the impact of the Buy American Hire America Executive Order and I-9 compliance.


UPCOMING SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

Ronald Klasko
Ron will be joining AILA at their first national conference in Europe, a one-day, two-track conference where attendees will get exposure to how the practice of U.S. immigration law fits into the global milieu. For more information and to register, click here.

Jessica DeNisi | F. Oliver Yang
Associates Jessica and Oliver will be speaking at the EB-5 Investor Based Immigration Conference, a two-day conference in Los Angeles that will delve into the intricacies of EB-5 for various audiences – attorneys, developers, investors and others. For more information and to register, click here.

Elise A. Fialkowski
Elise will be speaking on a panel entitled “Locals first! The global rise of protectionist immigration policies” at the International Bar Association (IBA) Annual Conference in Rome, Italy. Her session will examine the impact of populist anti-immigration rhetoric on global immigration policy-making.

Ronald Klasko
In October, Ron will be speaking to students at The Wharton School of University of Pennsylvania and Harvard Business School. He will be presenting on the latest trends and visa options for MBA graduates.

Feige M. Grundman
Feige will be presenting to faculty, staff, scholars, and students of Carnegie Mellon University and Oberlin College and Conservatory on the latest trends and issues affecting universities.

Andrew J. Zeltner
Drew will be participating in a discussion that will examine the impact of the Buy American, Hire American Executive Order on review of nonimmigrant visa petitions by the USCIS. For more information and to register, click here.

William A. Stock
Bill will be speaking at the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Annual Conference on a panel outlining the immigration processes necessary to hire from abroad, and the best legal practices that allow for successful use of the employment-based immigration program. For more details and to register, visit here.

Ronald Klasko | Anu Nair
Ron and Anu will be speaking at the two-day AILA/IIUSA EB-5 Industry Forum in Chicago, a conference that will offer unprecedented opportunities to learn, network, drive business development, and have fun at social events in one of America’s most vibrant cities. For more information and to register, click here.

Elise A. Fialkowski
Firm partner Elise Fialkowski is proud to host a luncheon in partnership with Women Owned Law. The event will discuss how lawyers have chosen particular niches and have become the “go-to” lawyers for their practice areas of law. For more details and to register, visit here.


ICYMI: RECENT BLOG POSTS AND ALERTS

Evaluating E-2 as an EB-5 Alternative
Oliver Yang outlines the six major factors Klasko attorneys use when evaluating whether an E-2 application is the right option as an alternative to EB-5.

Evaluating EB-1A Extraordinary Ability as an Alternative to EB-5
Feige Grundman lays out a viable alternative option to EB-5 with this article about clients potentially qualifying for EB-1A status as proven experts in their respective fields.

Evaluating EB-1C Multinational Manager as an Alternative to EB-5
Michele Madera highlights the details of EB-1C managerial classifications as an alternative entry into the U.S. for an executive or person in a managerial capacity for an overseas employer that is being transferred to the U.S..

Successful Expedited Case Processing in EB-5
Although USCIS has long allowed any petitioner or applicant to request expedited processing in any immigration matter, the granting of the Tryon exemplar and I-526 petitions expedited processing has caused controversy in the industry and prompted a lot of misinformation and disparagement of the project and those who speak of the expedite. As the attorney who prepared and filed the expedite request, Daniel B. Lundy sets the record straight in this article.

Klasko Announces New Evaluation Service for U.S. Immigration Options
Chinese nationals seeking to immigrate to the U.S. are experiencing a time of transition. H. Ronald Klasko believes the firm is ideally situated to assist in the process of evaluating EB-5 alternative options and spells out the details in this article.

How Acquiring Dual Citizenship By Investment Can Be An Important Part Of A Successful U.S. Immigration Strategy
When Ron accepted the offer to serve as a member of the Governing Board and serve as the North American regional representative office of the Geneva-based Investment Migration, he had no idea that his work there would become such an important part of his practice in finding various pathways to citizenship, but his unique journey has led to innovative solutions. Read more in this article.

The EB-5 Immigration Program and the Investors Process
In this infographic, Klasko Immigration Law Partners highlights the steps for wealthy foreign nationals with no employment sponsorship or family in the United States to gain permanent resident status through the EB-5 program.

Introduction to EB-5 for Indian Nationals: Steps of the EB-5 Process
Is India the new EB-5 frontier? This article by Anu Nair explores the initial lukewarm interest and heavy skepticism of the EB-5 program from the Indian community and how recent changes to H-1B adjudication in addition to wait times of 10+ years for other programs has sparked interest in EB-5 as a viable option to their immigration woes.

CLIENT ALERT: USCIS Extends the Suspension of Premium Processing for Certain H-1B Petitions Effective September 11
Keeping abreast of the USCIS changes, William A. Stock sent out a client alert, notifying those who may be affected by the extension and expansion of the temporary suspension of premium processing for cap-subject H-1B petitions, effective September 11, 2018.

CLIENT ALERT: EB-1 Green Cards for the Best And Brightest Are Now Backlogged Worldwide
Staying alert on the updates in U.S. Department of State, Feige reported that the worldwide backlog for EB-1 visas will likely continue through at least October and possibly into December 2018 and potentially 2019 worldwide.


FIRM FEATURE

Celebrating Three Years as Philadelphia Business Journal’s Best Places to Work
For the third year in a row, Klasko Immigration Law Partners has been recognized by Philadelphia Business Journal as one of the Best Places to Work. On Friday, September 14, the firm celebrated with a global luncheon featuring delectable eats from Italy, Japan, Portugal, and the United States. Read the press release here.

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This newsletter was prepared with the assistance of ABIL, the Alliance of Business Immigration Lawyers, of which Klasko Immigration Law Partners is an active member.

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